Foodie on Campus: The College Student’s Guide to life as a foodie, served with a scoop of nutrition, fitness, and health on the side. https://www.foodieoncampus.com Mon, 11 Jun 2018 09:53:10 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1 Avoiding The Freshman 15: Tips and Tricks https://www.foodieoncampus.com/avoiding-the-freshman-15-tips-and-tricks/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/avoiding-the-freshman-15-tips-and-tricks/#respond Mon, 12 Sep 2016 02:48:28 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5928 If there is one universal thing that college-bound students worry about, it’s avoiding the Freshman 15. I’ve worked with thousands of teens in my private practice, and this is the hot button, the thing they obsess over. While it is true that college students do tend to gain weight during... MORE>

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hamburger-and-salad

If there is one universal thing that college-bound students worry about, it’s avoiding the Freshman 15. I’ve worked with thousands of teens in my private practice, and this is the hot button, the thing they obsess over. While it is true that college students do tend to gain weight during their freshman year, studies show it to be 7 pounds or less, not the proverbial 15. That does not mean that gaining weight Freshman year is inevitable, it just takes some mindfulness. Avoid these traps and instead follow my tried and true tips for avoiding the bulge.

Problem: Skipping Breakfast

I know you’ve heard it over and over that “breakfast is the most important meal of the day” and it’s true. Easier said than done when you would rather catch a few extra zz’s rather than hit the dining hall for breakfast.
oats
Solution:
Stock your dorm room with grab and go breakfast options. Try these combos to keep you full and focused. Unflavored instant oatmeal (you will use less sugar by sweetening it yourself) with nuts, peanut butter and jelly sandwich on multigrain bread, unsweetened Greek yogurt and nuts, or 2 cheese sticks with multigrain crackers. Even better add a piece of fruit and you have hit most, if not all, of the food groups.

Problem: Skipping Meals

Breakfast is not the only meal college students often skip and eating your 3 squares helps keep your metabolism up. Sure, it’s tempting to skip lunch or dinner so you can cram in some extra study time, but skipping meals leads to bingeing, which will definitely lead to weight gain. Plus it’s important to take breaks so you will be more productive.

bean saladSolution:

Look at your reasons for skipping meals. Are you just not motivated to get to the dining hall? Schedule meals with friends and you will have no excuses! Maybe you are just not that organized. This is the time to get out your planner, look at your class schedule, and make sure to schedule meals. If all else fails, have nutritious snacks on hand.

Problem: The 4th meal:

Watch out for that 4th meal. College students are notorious for staying up late, as a matter of fact your body clock is set a bit differently. You get a little hungry, and before you know it you are ordering pizza or insomnia cookies. Stock your dorm room with healthy snacks and when the late night hunger hits, you don’t even have to wait to eat.

chocolate bark_featureSolution:
Avoiding the freshman 15 is possible! Make sure to stock your mini fridge with low-sugar yogurts, fruits and veggies, hummus, and cheese sticks. Fill your food bin with dried fruits and vegetables, nuts and nut butters, whole grain crackers or pita, and Kind bars (I am biased). Oh, and a little dark chocolate goes a long way to take care of your sweet tooth.

Problem: Drinking your calories.
Binge drinking not only adds on the calories, but alcohol also has no nutritional value and often leads to late night overeating. Speaking of drinking your calories, sodas, fancy coffee drinks, and many commercial smoothies can add up.

juice and smoothiesSolution:
No lecture here, just be mindful of beverages. Substitute fresh brewed coffee or tea for loaded coffee drinks. If you really want that Frappuccino, go for it but choose the smallest size. Look for smoothie places that really use fresh fruit instead of fruit-flavored syrups.

Problem: No time or energy to workout.
Just like making sure you have regular meals, it is important to get regular exercise.
group of smiling women with exercise balls in gym
Solution:

If you are not an athlete, you have to schedule in time for exercise. Take out your planner, look at your schedule, and write it in as if it were a class. If you don’t like traditional gym workouts, check to see if there are group classes you would enjoy. Make an exercise date with a friend and combine social time with workout time.

Problem: Getting Enough Sleep

Yeah right! Seriously, though. Getting enough sleep will help you feel better, focus better, and actually prevent overeating. It is easy to confuse tired with hungry, and some studies show that inadequate sleep leads to overeating. Studies also show that cramming does not usually work, and could even make matter worse.
Finals Sleep
Solution:
This is a no-brainer, but easier said than done! Again, look at your schedule to make sure you are leaving enough time for a good night’s sleep (at least some nights). Find a friend and hold each other accountable. Cat-naps can help, but they are no substitute for a good nights’ sleep.

Problem: All you can eat dining halls.

Beware of the buffet mentality – You’re paying a ton of money for your meal plan, right, so you want to get your money’s worth! The one swipe system on most college meal plans allow you to choose from an array of foods, including a good variety of sweet treats, without putting limits on how much you can take. You can even go back multiple times for more.

Solution:
Set your own personal limit on return trips to the food stations and digging into dessert. Put together a full meal the first time you go into the food area. It takes discipline, but learning how to take care of yourself is part of what college is all about.

fresh-fruitProblem: Too Much Restriction or Dieting.

Studies show that deprivation leads to binging. Also, eating too little lowers your metabolism, setting you up for further weight gain.

sweet potato friesSolution:

Don’t deprive – Make sure you do have some fun foods, AKA pizza, sweets, burgers and fries, to name a few, every so often. Follow the 80/20 rule – eat nutritiously 80 percent of the time and have your treats 20 percent.

Problem: Not Eating Enough Fruits and Veggies

Eating your fruits and veggies helps you stay full and can really round out a meal. When you don’t get enough, you tend to eat more of the snack and fun foods.
cold cut salad
Solution:
Load up on colors by piling your plate with salad bar selections and side servings of veggies from the hot food line. Many dining halls offer grab-and-go fruit so take advantage of this. Visit farmers’ markets if possible to stock up on fresh produce for your dorm. Many schools have shuttle buses to area grocery stores. See if you have that option and take a weekly trip to the grocery store.

We’ve made it easier for you! Sign up for our newsletter for a free Dorm Dining Grocery List to take on your next shopping trip.

Share your tips for avoiding the freshman 15 in the comments below:

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Everyday Gut Health https://www.foodieoncampus.com/everyday-gut-health/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/everyday-gut-health/#respond Wed, 17 Aug 2016 20:16:52 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5916 Drive-thru dinners two or three nights in a row isn’t a big deal, right? Making nutritious decisions can be tough when you’re pressed for time and short on change. We’ve all been there! When your schedule is slammed and stress is high, resorting to foods loaded with fat and sugar... MORE>

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yogurt in bed

Drive-thru dinners two or three nights in a row isn’t a big deal, right? Making nutritious decisions can be tough when you’re pressed for time and short on change. We’ve all been there! When your schedule is slammed and stress is high, resorting to foods loaded with fat and sugar is tempting. These foods are fine in moderation, but if this type of diet becomes the norm, your gut will suffer – big time.

Like it or not, anything you decide to eat or drink will eventually make its way to your GI (gastrointestinal) tract, or gut. You can think of your GI tract as a long tube, protected by a thin lining which houses millions of bacteria, both good and bad. The good bacteria in your gut are essential to keeping your body’s metabolism, digestion and absorption working like a well-oiled machine.

asparagus pie

So why care about gut health? Eating foods that promote the good bacteria in your GI tract not only leads to a healthy metabolism, but research also highlights the link between gut health and mental health. In short, a healthy gut can reduce anxiety levels by controlling stress hormones, which affect both mental well-being and skin health. Lastly, supporting gut health can also boost immunity and protect the body against infection.

Prebiotics

Like most people, you’ve probably heard of prebiotics, but don’t really know what they are. Prebiotics are found in fiber-rich foods and support the growth of probiotics, or “good” bacteria. Delicious prebiotic foods include whole-wheat grains, dandelion root, onions, garlic, asparagus, broccoli, leeks, bananas, legumes, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and radishes. (Fun fact: prebiotics can even increase calcium absorption!)

grilled broccoli

Probiotics

Crucial for a healthy gut that supports immunity, metabolism, brain function, and skin health, probiotics are the “good” bacteria that keep your gut in check. In order to colonize your GI tract, these live cultures must be introduced through the diet. To invigorate your gut, enjoy fermented foods such as yogurt containing cultures like bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Non-dairy options include tempeh, sauerkraut, pickles, and kombucha tea.

banana and yogurt

To power-boost your gut, pair prebiotic and probiotic foods together! Eat a banana with cereal and yogurt for breakfast, or try a kale salad with kombucha tea for lunch. As you reflect on your times of stress, periodic acne breakouts, sickness, and fatigue, see if you can trace it back to nutrition. Plan ahead during stressful times, so your body doesn’t take a hit during the chaos roller coaster.

Jackie Parker is currently a senior nutritional sciences student on the dietetics track at Texas A&M University.

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How to Choose the Right Cooking Oil https://www.foodieoncampus.com/choose-right-cooking-oil/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/choose-right-cooking-oil/#respond Fri, 12 Aug 2016 01:30:12 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5909   Any college amateur chef has set off the fire alarm once or twice. Perhaps trying a new recipe that called for deep-frying, sautéing, or baking certain ingredients caused the fire, but using the wrong cooking oil resulted in a messy cloud of smoke. To avoid any future false alarms... MORE>

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olive oil and olives

Any college amateur chef has set off the fire alarm once or twice. Perhaps trying a new recipe that called for deep-frying, sautéing, or baking certain ingredients caused the fire, but using the wrong cooking oil resulted in a messy cloud of smoke. To avoid any future false alarms or peeved roommates, use this guide to which oils should be used for certain types of cooking.

Choosing the right cooking oil from a plethora of options can be a daunting task. In order to pick, you must first know why you are using it. The type of oil used for a salad dressing will be very different than the type used for pan-searing steak tenderloin. Why? The flavor, fatty acid composition, along with the smoke point of the oil will dictate your decision making in the kitchen. Smoke Point is the temperature at which the fats begin to break down to produce smoke, and ultimately affect the taste of your food.

Dressing ingredients on a rustic background. Olive oil, balsamic vinegar, herbs, salt and pepper. Selective focus

Dressings, Dips, and Marinades

Not all oils are created equal. Some should not be heated for flavor and nutrition retention. Use these types of oils to get a healthy dose of omega-3s.

  • Wheat Germ Oil (225°F)
  • Flax Seed Oil (225°F)
  • Walnut Oil (320°F)
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil (320°F)
  • Sesame Oil (410°F)

Sautéing, Sauces, and Baking

So you’re upping the ante and need to use to heat to craft your delicious dish, try these types of oils for medium heat recipes.

  • Pumpkin Seed Oil (320°F)
  • Hemp Seed Oil (330°F)
  • Coconut Oil (350°F)
  • Butter (350°F)
  • Soybean Oil (450°F)
  • Corn Oil (450°F)
  • Safflower Oil (450°F)

asian cuisine

Stir Frying or High Temp Oven-Baking

Alright, let’s not create a cloud of smoke trying to make stir fry veggies. Here are your go-to oils for moderately high- temperature cooking techniques.

  • Grapeseed Oil (392°F)
  • Canola Oil (400°F)
  • Peanut Oil (450°F)
  • Light Olive Oil (Refined) (460-468°F)

Frying and Searing

Maybe you want to make some fried chicken and waffles for a Sunday brunch treat! You most definitely need the right oil so you don’t waste your precious time and money cleaning up a disaster. Go for these:

  • Almond Oil (420°F)
  • Sunflower Oil (450°F)
  • Ghee Clarified Butter (485°F)
  • Rice-Bran Oil (490°F)
  • Avocado Oil (520°F)

walnuts

Clearer liquids, typically more refined oils, will have higher smoke points. Vegetable oils will also have higher smoke points than animal oils. Remember that oils are a type of fat and it is easy to go overboard, so be mindful when pouring. Get your burners ready. Now you can keep your eyebrow hair.

Jackie Parker is currently a senior nutritional sciences student on the dietetics track at Texas A&M University.

 

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Avocado Hummus in 4 Easy Steps https://www.foodieoncampus.com/avocado-hummus/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/avocado-hummus/#respond Wed, 03 Aug 2016 18:00:07 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5811 Hummus is one of the stars of the Mediterranean diet. Traditionally made with tahini (sesame paste), we’ve substituted avocado. Impress your friends this summer with this super simple spin on hummus. Serve as a dip with veggies and pita chips or spread it on bread for a fabulous protein option... MORE>

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Avocado HummusHummus is one of the stars of the Mediterranean diet. Traditionally made with tahini (sesame paste), we’ve substituted avocado. Impress your friends this summer with this super simple spin on hummus. Serve as a dip with veggies and pita chips or spread it on bread for a fabulous protein option in vegetarian and vegan sandwiches.

Avocado Hummus with VeggiesIngredients

1 can chick peas, drained and rinsed

1 avocado, pitted and peeled

2 tb. Fresh lemon juice

2-3 cloves garlic

2 tb. Olive oil

½ tsp salt

Directions:

  1. Combine chick peas, avocado, lemon juice, garlic and salt in food processor.
  2. Pulse until chopped.
  3. Gradually add olive oil and process until mixture is creamy.

Photo Credit: Laura Sandoval

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The Ultimate Egg Hunt: Guide to Deciphering Grocery-Store Egg Labels https://www.foodieoncampus.com/ultimate-egg-hunt-guide-deciphering-grocery-store-egg-labels/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/ultimate-egg-hunt-guide-deciphering-grocery-store-egg-labels/#respond Mon, 01 Aug 2016 16:57:30 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5887 Possibly one of the most intimidating places in the grocery store is the egg shelf with so many options it can be hard to figure out what to buy. From free-range to pasture raised to vegetarian-fed, is it really worth paying almost $1-2 extra for a certain type of egg?... MORE>

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Veggie OmeletPossibly one of the most intimidating places in the grocery store is the egg shelf with so many options it can be hard to figure out what to buy. From free-range to pasture raised to vegetarian-fed, is it really worth paying almost $1-2 extra for a certain type of egg? Are different color eggshells better than the other? These are all probably questions flooding your mind as you stand there staring into the refrigerator shelves.

Lucky for you, the most common terms in the egg department have been cracked (pun intended).

Brown and White EggsBrown or White Shells

Plain and simple—shell color does NOT dictate the quality of the egg, nor nutritional supremacy. The color of the egg is simply a result of varying hen genetics. Why the price difference? Chickens that produce brown eggs typically require more feed, thus costing more per egg.

Eggs in CratesEgg Grades (AA, A, B)

If something is AA then it’s significantly healthier, right? Wrong. The grade of the egg has nothing to do with nutrition quality. It has everything to do with the quality and appearance of the egg white and shell. The higher the grade means the thicker the egg white, which comes in handy for different types of cooking methods. Grade AA is ideal for frying and poaching since the egg white and yolk will keep its shape. Grade A is a great option for hard cooking, while Grade B is often used for baked goods.

Certified Organic

This can be a fuzzy term for some consumers. Essentially certified organic eggs are free of antibiotics and hormones, although other egg types legally allow no trace hormones. Also, certified organic eggs may actually be more nutritious than the conventional egg type if the chicken was allowed to graze in a cage-free environment.

Free Range ChicksFree Range and Cage-free

The idea of an animal cooped up its entire life horrifies certain individuals. Careful with these terms, since it doesn’t necessarily promise the chickens were absolutely outside. Simply, the chickens are allowed to roam around inside without being in a cage, and possibly be allowed access to the outdoors for a certain amount of time. However, there is no requirement for the chickens to go outdoors if it does not choose to wander. Most agree that this term isn’t enough of a reason to pay the extra costs.

Omega-3s Enriched

Eggs already have a decent amount of omega-3s. Not worth the extra money for a buzzword.

EggsPastured Raised

Multiple studies have shown that free roaming chickens with access to a variety of foods, such as insects and different vegetation have the best nutritional value. Most of the time you have to find a farmer nearby or at a farmer’s market who specifically raise these types of chickens. Depending on where you live, this option could be cheaper or more expensive.

Eggs are an egg-cellent way of getting your protein, good cholesterol and fats, along with essential vitamins and minerals that help boost brain health. Whatever egg type you choose after your egg hunt; know that you’re picking a food that will be nutritious and filling.

Jackie Parker currently a senior nutritional sciences student on the dietetics track at Texas A&M University.

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Stone Fruit Soup https://www.foodieoncampus.com/stone-fruit-soup/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/stone-fruit-soup/#respond Tue, 26 Jul 2016 17:51:26 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5875 Too hot to cook? Whip up this easy stone fruit soup, grab some crusty bread and hummus or make a big salad for a no fuss meal. Ingredients: 2 peaches, sliced 2 nectarines, sliced 2 apricots, quartered 1 container Siggi’s peach yogurt 1 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp toasted almonds... MORE>

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Stone Fruit Soup

Too hot to cook? Whip up this easy stone fruit soup, grab some crusty bread and hummus or make a big salad for a no fuss meal.

Ingredients:

2 peaches, sliced

2 nectarines, sliced

2 apricots, quartered

1 container Siggi’s peach yogurt

1 tsp lemon juice

1 tsp toasted almonds

mint for garnish

Serves 2

Stone Fruit IngredientsInstructions:

Combine fruit, yogurt, and lemon juice in a blender or food processor. Process until smooth. Refrigerate until chilled. Top with toasted almonds and mint.

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Raisin’ the Root: Key Things to Know About Ginger and Turmeric https://www.foodieoncampus.com/raisin-root-key-things-know-ginger-turmeric/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/raisin-root-key-things-know-ginger-turmeric/#respond Wed, 20 Jul 2016 21:43:08 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5864 Ginger and turmeric are the new “it” couple. Ginger, most commonly used in gingersnaps, gingerbread cookies or ginger ale, is more nutritious when enjoyed fresh! Like ginger, turmeric is a common spice, often used in Indian cuisine, known for its fragrant flavor and fantastic yellow color. Both originate from the... MORE>

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ginger-tumericGinger and turmeric are the new “it” couple. Ginger, most commonly used in gingersnaps, gingerbread cookies or ginger ale, is more nutritious when enjoyed fresh! Like ginger, turmeric is a common spice, often used in Indian cuisine, known for its fragrant flavor and fantastic yellow color. Both originate from the same plant family and are types of roots, known as rhizomes.

(College Budget Tip: you can regenerate turmeric and ginger roots by cutting a portion of the stem and planting it… wow!)

These spices have much more to offer than taste. The health benefits of eating ginger and turmeric daily are tremendous! Read on to find out why some people call these roots miraculous.

gingerGinger

  • Antioxidant Power-House

Ginger has almost the same amount of antioxidants as berries! Adding ginger to your diet is a tasty and substantial way of getting an extra antioxidant boost. Why is this important? Your body undergoes all sorts of stress caused by aging, physical activity, actual stress of a breakup or losing a love one, and just general daily wear and tear. Antioxidants can help fill in the gaps caused by those things to help your body regroup.

ginger-flower

  • Inflammation Reducer

Some people consume ginger for headaches or menstrual cramps instead of reaching for the ibuprofen! Research has shown that people who consume ginger report less pain due to arthritis and other chronic pain diseases. Ginger contains a potent gingerol component that is attributed to help ease the aching. Toss some ginger into your smoothie after a difficult workout to help recovery!

  • Nausea Helper

Maybe this is a no brainer… but ginger actually does help with nausea. It helps relieve stomach discomfort caused by gas build up. Try eating ginger before a bumpy road trip or a boat ride to avoid motion sickness. Or even try making some ginger tea after a night out on the town to kick that hangover to the curb!

turmericTurmeric

  • Protect and BOOST Your Brain

Turmeric, also known as the golden spice, is literally gold in helping your brain function better than normal. Curcumin, the beneficial part of turmeric, makes this spice act like a superhero. It can increase DHA levels that help with brain development and protection and also helps remove plaque and metal build up that leads to dementia and Alzheimer’s. Research has linked it to lower levels of depression and common brain diseases, all while improving memory and brain function. Chaaaa-ching.

  • Who Wants to Get Old?

Turmeric is the closest thing you’ll get to Peter Pan. Yes, curcumin is on the MVP list when it comes to edible anti-aging solutions. The mixture of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory components in turmeric will help combat almost any chronic disease. Cancer and heart disease, for example, have been shown in some cases to be prevented and even treated by turmeric. To keep things simple, turmeric helps everything from optimal brain function to joint health to combatting the daily cold to protecting your heart.

tumeric-plant

  • Cashing In the Golden Spice

There is a bit of a caveat with curcumin. It can be difficult for your body to absorb. In order to fix that issue, combining pepperine, found in black pepper, and turmeric make it more available for absorption. Also, curcumin is fat-soluble, meaning that it should be consumed with a nutritious source of fat like olive oil, fish or avocado.

Jackie Parker is currently a senior nutritional sciences student on the dietetics track at Texas A&M University.

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Jazz Up Your Boring Smoothies With These 20 Fun Add-Ins https://www.foodieoncampus.com/jazz-boring-smoothies-20-fun-add-ins/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/jazz-boring-smoothies-20-fun-add-ins/#respond Mon, 27 Jun 2016 13:14:40 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5834   Tired of the same old smoothies? Having a hard time breaking out of a rut? If you’re lacking brainpower, here are 20 scrumptiously nutritious smoothie add-ins to help you get creative! Cacao Nibs Meet dark chocolate’s better-looking and less-processed cousin. This chocolatey powerhouse is packed with antioxidants, polyphenols, and... MORE>

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pink smoothie

Tired of the same old smoothies? Having a hard time breaking out of a rut? If you’re lacking brainpower, here are 20 scrumptiously nutritious smoothie add-ins to help you get creative!

  • Cacao Nibs

cacao nibs

Meet dark chocolate’s better-looking and less-processed cousin. This chocolatey powerhouse is packed with antioxidants, polyphenols, and fiber, improving mood and helping you relax.

  • Pumpkin Seeds

pumpkin seeds

Low on iron? Shockingly, most people are deficient. Boost your supply with this crunchy mix-in!

  • Sunflower Seeds

sunflower seeds

Need help seeing the sunny side? Help brighten your mood with this great source of magnesium, shown to help alleviate depression.

  • Hemp Seeds

hemp seeds

Small but mighty, hemp seeds are packed with fiber, healthy omega fatty acids, essential amino acids, and protein.

  • Honey

honey

Perfect for a sweet touch! Try adding 1-2 tablespoons to make your smoothie a tad sweeter or less bitter.

  • Spinach

spinach

This leafy green is packed with phytonutrients that reduce inflammation. Toss in 1-2 handfuls to enhance muscle and bone health.

  • Kale

kale

The ultimate brain food that supports a healthy mind and body! Try adding 1-2 cups of kale to your daily smoothie for extra fiber, vitamins, iron, antioxidants, and calcium.

  • Olive oil

olive oil

Adding healthy fats to your diet helps you stay full and focused and increases nutrient absorption. Throw a tablespoon of olive oil into your morning smoothie for flavor, fullness and added nutrition!

  • Green Tea

green tea

Add some Zen to your smoothie and your body will thank you. Brew a pitcher of this mental and physical performance enhancer to use as a base for your smoothies!

  • Peanut Butter

peanut butter smoothie

Need a creamy and delicious protein fix? Look no further. Remember to choose brands with no added sugars, and try to keep it to 1-2 tablespoons per smoothie. (Tip: Toss in blueberries for a PB&J flavor!)

  • Moringa

moringa powder

This leafy tree, grown in tropical regions, is an impressive source of essential nutrients that most people don’t get in their everyday diet. Made by drying the leaves of the tree, you can count on moringa to supply vitamin C, iron, protein, and B vitamins!

  • Oats

oats

Need to stay full? The fiber found in oats will keep you satisfied for hours. Add a cup to your smoothie for a boost in fiber and beneficial vitamins and minerals.

  • Turmeric

turmeric

Often called the “miracle spice,” turmeric helps fight against countless chronic illnesses. Plus, its zesty and fragrant flavor will jazz up any smoothie!

  • Beets

beet smoothie

Aside from their rich red color, beets contain naturally-occurring nitrates which improve your body’s oxygen supply. Try drinking a beet smoothie before or after your workout for improved stamina and recovery!

  • Dandelion Root

dandelion root tea

This add-in is most commonly available as a tea, which can be used as a base for smoothies to enhance liver function.

  • Instant Coffee/Coffee/ Espresso

instant coffee

To tame your morning caffeine craving, add a small amount of instant coffee to your smoothie. Make sure to read the serving size information so you aren’t bouncing off the walls!

  • Herbs (Parsley, Basil, Thyme, Mint)

herbs

For an intense flavor profile, herbs are your go-to. Have your own garden? Awesome! Throw in a few leaves and taste the difference.

  • Nutmeg

nutmeg

Did you know that nutmeg can promote better sleep? Toss a teaspoon or two into your end-of-the-day smoothie. Sweet dreams!

  • Avocado

avocado

If you love ice cream, avocados will give your smoothie this consistency! Blend in a small avocado for a solid source of fiber and healthy fats.

  • Coconut Water

coconut water

Say hello to electrolyte heaven! Beat the summer heat by refueling with this nutritious sports drink alternative. Coconut water is a fantastic base for blending your fruit!

Jackie Parker is currently a senior nutritional sciences student on the dietetics track at Texas A&M University.

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10 Easy No-Cook Dinners For Busy Summer Interns https://www.foodieoncampus.com/10-easy-no-cook-dinners-busy-summer-interns/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/10-easy-no-cook-dinners-busy-summer-interns/#respond Fri, 17 Jun 2016 18:01:31 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5818 The taste of the real world is exciting, yet you keep coming home hungry. Then, you have to choose between takeout or trying to eat healthy at home?! Tough one. If you’re in a new city and don’t have a car to make grocery runs, or if your summer apartment... MORE>

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officeThe taste of the real world is exciting, yet you keep coming home hungry. Then, you have to choose between takeout or trying to eat healthy at home?! Tough one.

If you’re in a new city and don’t have a car to make grocery runs, or if your summer apartment is missing the fancy cookware you’re used to, don’t sweat it. Foodie On Campus has your back. These quick, nutritious dinners will make your wallet and your stomach happy!

  1. Caprese Salad

caprese salad

This recipe will literally take you five minutes to make, and it’s delicious. Stop by a local famer’s market to grab some ripe tomatoes, basil, and fresh mozzarella. Thinly slice the tomatoes, layer the basil and sliced mozzarella on top, and finish it off with olive oil, balsamic vinegar a pinch of kosher salt, and ground pepper.

  1. Avocado Toast

avocado toast

Toast and guac… what a fabulous avo-couple! This filling combination of healthy fats and whole grains will tame your hangry mood. For a veggie boost, add sliced cucumbers, alfalfa sprouts, sliced radishes, or bell peppers. For your protein fix, top with pine nuts, sliced almonds, chickpeas, leftover chicken, or even some cut up deli meat.

  1. Turkey and Avocado Pita

turkey avocado pita

Add thinly sliced turkey, avocado, feta cheese, and alfalfa sprouts for a mouth-watering pita bread sandwich! Drizzle with white wine vinaigrette and call it a day.

  1. Cold Cuts Salad

cold cut salad

Who said deli meat is only for sandwiches? Take your favorite leafy greens, vegetables, and add your cold cuts of choice. Most grocery stores sell thinly sliced chicken, turkey breast and ham. Be creative! Health Hack: Low sodium cold cuts are the best option.

  1. Tuna Salad and Crackers

tuna salad crackers

This quick meal is perfect in a pinch. Mix a can of tuna with a dollop of mayonnaise (or Greek yogurt if you prefer), and add sliced grapes, craisins, or relish for a sweet touch. Eat your tuna salad on crackers, whole-grain bread, or make lettuce wraps!

  1. Lentil and Tomato Salad

lentil tomato salad

For a protein-packed meal, combine a can of low-sodium lentils with a handful of sliced cherry tomatoes. To heighten the flavor, toss in chives, parsley, or basil. Add a small amount of white wine vinaigrette and/or olive oil for a tangy touch.

  1. Chickpea, Cucumber, Feta Salad

chickpea cucumber feta salad

Mix a can of low-sodium chickpeas with one thinly sliced cucumber. Drizzle with olive oil and white wine vinaigrette, and top with feta cheese. Tomatoes and sliced red onions are perfect for flavor cravers!

  1. Cheese, Meat, Fruit Platter

cheese meat fruit platter

Pair fruits such as grapes, oranges, and apples with tasty deli meats like turkey, salami, or prosciutto, and complete the trifecta with cheeses such as brie, swiss, Gouda, or cheddar.

  1. “While-You’re-At-Work” Oats

overnight oats

Before you head out, toss some rolled oats, chia seeds, and cinnamon into a mason jar with peanut butter, mashed bananas, Greek yogurt, honey, and almond milk. You’ll come home to the most delicious meal that’s ready to eat cold. Sprinkle in walnuts, almonds, or pecans for extra protein!

  1. Rotisserie Chicken

rotisserie chicken

One of the best ways to avoid cooking is to buy rotisserie chicken from the grocery store! This meal is a great option if you don’t have the time or resources to cook over the summer and it will cover several meals. Cut a few slices of chicken and pair with a salad or your favorite veggies.

Jackie Parker is currently a senior nutritional sciences student on the dietetics track at Texas A&M University.

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Get Your Smoothie On! https://www.foodieoncampus.com/smoothie-round-up/ https://www.foodieoncampus.com/smoothie-round-up/#respond Fri, 10 Jun 2016 23:06:13 +0000 https://www.foodieoncampus.com/?p=5793 Are you stuck in the same old smoothie rut? It happens! This recipe roundup will help expand your horizons and get your creative juices flowing with the added benefit of upping your fruit and veggie intake. A smoothie a day just might keep the doctor away. 1. Green Avocado Peach... MORE>

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Strawberry Peach SmoothieAre you stuck in the same old smoothie rut? It happens! This recipe roundup will help expand your horizons and get your creative juices flowing with the added benefit of upping your fruit and veggie intake. A smoothie a day just might keep the doctor away.

1. Green Avocado Peach Smoothie
greensmoothie

2. Strawberry Banana Lemon Smoothie
strawbananalemsmoothie

3. Beet the Heat Tropical Smoothie
beettropical

4. Green Mojito Smoothie
mojito

5. Strawberry Banana Smoothie
strawbanana

6. Thrive Green Blender Juice
greenjuice

7. The Ultimate Spring Super Smoothie

Ultimate Celery Pineapple Smoothie

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